Scranalogue

Culture Heritage Learning

SPAN – Forth Bridges Exhibition in Kirkcaldy, Fife

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Invitation to Forth Rail Bridge opening of 1890

Whenever Scran engages with the public, one of the most frequently asked questions is “What is the ‘Buy’ button under Scran records for?” For the most part our users can ignore it; all Scran subscribers are entitled to save, download and reuse any of our records for non-commercial purposes (and our institutional subscribers can share our records within and between institutions too). But what happens when you want to use Scran records in a commercial or public situation, one which isn’t covered by the above? When you’re publishing a magazine or a book, for example? Or creating an exhibition for the general public? That’s where the ‘Buy’ button comes in.

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Clicking the button initiates a ‘licensing’ process, where the user tells us what they want to use the record (image, audio clip or video clip) for. Scran then gives the user a quote for usage, and the price for usage depends on how many times the record will be used, and where, and at what size; the price for using a large Scran image on the cover of a book that will be printed 100,000 times will be greater, for example, than that for a thumbnail image that will be reprinted on page 8 of a small circulation newsletter. The money raised by licensing materials in this way is split 50/50 between Scran and the owners of the materials.

One organisation that recently licensed a nimg_25141umber of Scran records in this way is Fife Cultural Trust, and Scran recently paid a visit to Kirkcaldy Galleries to see the resulting exhibition ‘SPAN- a Tale of Three Bridges + Kate Downie‘. It’s a great look at the history of the Forth Rail Bridge, the first Forth Road Bridge and the new road bridge that is due to open next year, and, in a separate gallery, there is a series of artistic responses by Kate Downie to the bridges themselves. In the first gallery, the history of the bridges, Scran images make up over 50% of the exhibition, and you can see some of the pictures that were used, in context, below. We especially like the large scale invitation for the opening of the Forth Rail Bridge, from National Museums Scotland- we think it looks great at such a scale. The exhibition continues until February 2017.

© Image: Forth Rail Bridge opening of 1890 from National Museums Scotland. Licensor www.scran.ac.uk.

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