Scranalogue

Culture Heritage Learning

New 3-D images on Scran

Last year, Scran was delighted to be contacted by Annabel Murray, who had an exciting find to share with us. She brought in a box of glass slides, along with an antique slide viewer. The slides were images of her stepfather as a young boy, along with members of his family, servants and other friends. Although the family had its roots in Scotland, the images were taken in Malawi in the 1930s. The most exciting part for us, though, was that the images were stereoscopic- in other words, the slides contained two images side-by-side, taken with a special camera with two lenses. The two lenses are set slightly apart and mimic what the human eyes see, so that each picture is slightly different, offset by a few centimetres. The resulting images can then be viewed in a stereoscopic viewer, a little bit like a pair of opera glasses, and the image appears to be 3-dimensional. The same principle was used in children’s View Master toys. It’s easier to see than to explain, so here’s a picture:

Viewer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The images themselves are terrific, and while they are certainly of historical and archival interest, we felt it was important to preserve their stereoscopic nature. They have a lot of scientific value- biology students and tutors will find these fascinating, as they are directly informed by the science of optics and the inner workings of the eye. We’ve digitised the images, with much help from the Historic Environment Scotland photography team, and made them available to download here. 

 

 

 

We’ve also digitised 12 images that seemingly came free with the viewer, a bit like the free reels that you get with a modern-day View Master. In this case, they’re images of the walled French medieval city, Carcassonne. Again, they’re really amazing curios. They can be seen at www.scran.ac.uk/s/carcassonne.

 

 

 

 

 

The best way to view them is on a mobile phone inserted into a special VR viewer like Google Cardboard (£5) or a Stealth VR (£15). Instructions are here: Using_stereoscopic_images_with_Virtual_Reality_headsets

VR Goggles

If you can get hold of a set of viewing goggles, you should. These images are really amazing, but for the full experience should be viewed in 3-D. Scran will be on the Historic Environment Scotland stand at the Scottish Learning Festival on 20th and 21st September (entry is free) and we’ll bring along a set of VR goggles so you can take a look!

 

 

Images © Annabel Murray, Historic Environment Scotland  Licensor Scran

Comments are closed.