Scranalogue

Culture Heritage Learning

Spring Fling at the Eric Liddell Centre Saturday May 6th

27th April 2017 by Scran | 0 comments

Scran will be exhibiting at the Spring Fling in Edinburgh’s Morningside on 6th May this year. Organised by the South Edinburgh Arts Fair, this annual event showcases local arts organisations and how they can support the local senior community. We’ll be offering advice on how to log on to Scran with a local library card, how to use Scran for research, family history and reminiscence work, and generally highlighting our fab local content along with relevant content from other HES databases such as Scotland’s Places and Canmore. We’ll be joining loads of other great organisations including Edinburgh City Singers, Edinburgh’s Got Soul, Living It Up Edinburgh and the Scottish Genealogy Society as well as dozens of others. Entry is FREE. See you there!

 

The Scottish Life Archive on Scran

25th April 2017 by Scran | 0 comments

The Scottish Life Archive, based at the National Museum of Scotland, offers a unique insight into many aspects of Scottish history and heritage. It aims to collect, record and preserve documentary and illustrative evidence of Scotland’s material culture & social history.

8,685 records from this fascinating collection are also available via scran.ac.uk – for example, here you see Adam Cramond & Son’s cab office at Charles Street, Edinburgh, 1912.

This cab office just off George Square was quite a large business at around that time. Broughams were often hired by doctors. They were small closed carriages drawn by one horse. Miss I. M Cramond, who was a child at the beginning of the 20th century and a member of Adam Cramond’s family, remembered that in 1904 doctors used them when they went on their rounds. At the beginning of the 20th century each firm of cab owners had a ‘stance’ where their cabs stood. Cramond’s was at Waterloo Place. The four-in-hand coaches also waited at Waterloo Place, and they would go as far afield as Roslin and the Forth Bridge.

The archive collection dates from the 1880s to the present day, but there is some material dating from 1700. You can discover old manuscripts, letters, trace your family history – the archive offers a unique insight into all aspects of Scottish life. If this interests you, archivist and curator Dorothy Kidd at the National Museum of Scotland is giving a talk all about the Scottish Life Archive and how it can be used for personal research. The event is part of Year of History, Heritage and Archaeology and further details can be found here. Of course, if you are unable to make it along to the live talk, you can continue your browsing or research online with Scran.

Images © National Museum of Scotland Licensor Scran 

Scran contributes to BBC Scotland

20th March 2017 by Scran | 0 comments

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Glasgow Gorbals 1970 – The Scotsman

Eagle-eyed viewers in Scotland who saw the recent three-part BBC series called “Growing Up in Scotland: A Century of Childhood” may have noticed Scran mentioned in the credits at the end of each episode. Combining still images, film footage and contemporary interviews, the three episodes were a nostalgic look at Scottish childhood, and we were delighted to be asked to supply many images for all three programmes, including one of our all-time favourites, the two Glasgow boys with Spacehoppers.

While the standard Scran licence doesn’t allow commercial reuse of images, we’re happy to grant commercial licences on an ad-hoc basis, and anyone can do this by clicking on the “Buy” button underneath an image. Scran regularly supplies images for commercial re-use to newspapers, magazines, book publishers and film and TV companies, and if you see a TV documentary about Scotland, take a close look at the credits at the end.BBC screenshot

There’s a good chance we’ll have supplied material for the programme. Viewers outside Scotland, and anyone who missed these fascinating documentaries, can catch up on the BBC’s iPlayer service http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episodes/b08gcxb6

Image © The Scotsman Publications Ltd Licensor Scran 

 

Scotland through Italian eyes

10th February 2017 by Scran | 0 comments

In January and February this year, Scran hosted 6 young students from Italy’s Istituto Pavoniano Artigianelli per le Arti grafiche in Trento. They were part of a large contingent from the college that were in Scotland to improve their English skills at the Edinburgh School of English on the city’s Royal Mile. As part of their two week stay, all the visiting students undertook short work placements in local creative industries and businesses.  The six students that were placed with Scran (Giorgia, Nicole, Tania, Chiara, Martina and Alessandro) were charged with capturing Scotland in photographic form during their stay, selecting their favourite shots and then captioning them, thereby enhancing their photographic skills and also their English vocabulary.

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Students from Italy on assignment to capture images for Scran

The captioning of the images was actually the most time-consuming aspect of the enterprise, as the students were all instructed to think of the end-users of Scran’s images (i.e. our subscribers), and try and second guess the search terms that they might use to come across the student’s images. This is harder than you may think, and the best captions on Scran employ synonyms, alternative spellings, plurals and more to try and maximise discoverability.

As budding designers, all of our students had a keen eye, and this was reflected in the photos, many of which are as good as any on Scran. They particularly enjoyed the soft winter light in Edinburgh, and the opportunities it provided for shadows, silhouettes and chiaroscuro images. You can see all their efforts here.

 

Images © Andrew James

 

Then and Now imagery

20th January 2017 by Scran | 0 comments

Mains Castle montage

A montage of Mains Castle, then and now, by Iain Robertson of South Lanarkshire

Last week, Scran met with Iain Robertson, the Development Officer of South Lanarkshire Libraries, in part to discuss the part Scran might play in the forthcoming East Kilbride 70th anniversary Celebrations. We’re greatly looking forward to this event, and will share more details as it approaches. In the meantime see some of our Scran East Kilbride content here.

While we were talking, Iain mentioned that he’d been playing around with some old Scran imagery of the local area around East Kilbride, and that he’d been inserting it into present-day pictures to create a sort of “Then and Now” montage. We think the results are stunning. The photo of St Bride’s in particular is terrific, as it restores an original feature (the tall tower) that has since been lost.

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A photo montage featuring St Bride’s Kirk, East Kilbride, then and now

The montaged image of Torrance House in East Kilbride, meanwhile, shows a building (in black and white with the cars parked outside it) that no longer exists, and a pond that has since been filled in! The original Scran Torrance House image is here. The original image from Scran of St Bride’s is here, while the original of Mains Castle is here. 

If you want to do something similar, at school, college, or just for fun, you can. Your Scran subscription gives you the right to download ANY Scran image (or sound or video) and to reuse it, edit it etc. If you do find an old pic and can insert it into a present-day image, as Iain has done, we’d be delighted to feature your montage here.

 

 

Torrance House photomontage

A montage of old and new images of Torrance House 

Images © The Scotsman Publications Ltd, Newsquest (Herald & Times), Newsquest (Herald & Times) | Licensor Scran

Audacious Women 2017

30th December 2016 by Scran | 0 comments

A gran on a skateboardScran is delighted to be taking part in the second Audacious Women Festival in February 2017, and we’d like your help. The festival was established in 2016 and this year takes place over the week of 18th to 26th February 2017. Comprising theatre, spoken word, poetry, workshops and more, the Festival aims to inspire women of all ages to “break down personal, political or institutional barriers, and to celebrate audacious women everywhere…women who have flaunted convention, taken risks and done audacious acts”.

As part of the Festival, Scran has been invited to curate an exhibition of Audacious Women at Edinburgh’s Central Library on George IV Bridge throughout the whole of February, and we plan to include sections on female pioneers such as Marie Stopes, Chrystal Macmillan and Elsie Inglis. But we want to include some public suggestions in our list of Audacious Women, and tell some stories about lesser-known female pioneers, or simply women who stepped outside their own comfort zone, in however small a way . And this is where we need your help. We’d like you to nominate your own Audacious Women for inclusion- perhaps your grandmother who was a pioneering campaigner, or your sister who conquered her fear of heights, or your mum, the first person in your family to go into further education. We’d love to hear their stories, and if you have any images, so much the better.  We can include the best ones in the exhibition, and, with your permission, all of the submitted materials can appear on Scran for others to see and read about.

To nominate someone you know, simply get in contact with us by e-mail here. Simply tell us who you’d like to nominate and why, and we’ll get back to you by e-mail to find out more and perhaps obtain a picture or two.

The exhibition runs from February 1st to February 28th 2017.

Image © Newsquest (Herald & Times) | Licensor Scran

 

 

Dunbar Bricks & Heritage Angels

5th December 2016 by Scran | 0 comments

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Mark Cranston – Heritage Angel Award Winner

Some of you may have heard about the recent Scottish Heritage Angel Awards? Here at Scran we caught wind of the fascinating work of Mark Cranston, who proceeded to win Category A for Investigating & Recording his extensive collection of bricks.

Scran has a pile of brick related content, which Mark was already familiar with, and through a series of fortunate events, we were able to contribute to his ever growing collection. East Lothian resident, Gina Williams, donated the brick which Scran then delivered to Jedburgh.

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The brick was from a Dunbar manufacturer and although he already had an example of a M.B. Sherriff brick, he had not seen this particular variation. One face on each has a shallow rectangular ‘frog’ or depression with text MB SHERRIFF/ DUNBAR and impressions of screw-heads.

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Invoice, Seafield Brick and Tile Works, 1868

Seafield Brick & Tile Works at West barns, near Dunbar, supplied the local market as well as special commissions in Scotland and abroad.  These bricks were made using deposits of surface clay; originally dark grey, the clay becomes red when fired, a change caused by the oxidation of iron contained in the clay. The Seafield brickworks operated from the early eighteen hundreds on land reclaimed from the sea between West Barns and Belhaven. Once in the hands of David France, it passed to William Brodie and then his relatives, the Sherriffs of West Barns. William Brodie, invested in new equipment and expanded the works, exporting many of the products on his own fleet of steam vessels from Dunbar Harbour.

Unusually for a Victorian industrialist, M.Brodie Sherriff  was a woman. In 1884 she purchased & re-opened the brickworks at Westbank, in Portobello, so expanding the business further.

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Seafield Brickworks, West Barns – surface clay pits

Nineteenth century East Lothian had a number of industrial scale plants producing bricks, tiles, pipes and other large scale ceramics. Seafield relied upon surface deposits of clay. Later, the abandoned clay pits were used to dump municipal waste and landfill until around 1970. Then the land was landscaped and planted; part was reserved for amenity, being integrated into the John Muir Country Park in 1976.

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You can see the full extent of Mark Cranston’s collection of bricks  http://www.scottishbrickhistory.co.uk/

download

 

 

 

Images ©  Mark Cranston, Scran & East Lothian Museums Service| Licensor Scran

SPAN – Forth Bridges Exhibition in Kirkcaldy, Fife

16th November 2016 by Scran | 0 comments

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Invitation to Forth Rail Bridge opening of 1890

Whenever Scran engages with the public, one of the most frequently asked questions is “What is the ‘Buy’ button under Scran records for?” For the most part our users can ignore it; all Scran subscribers are entitled to save, download and reuse any of our records for non-commercial purposes (and our institutional subscribers can share our records within and between institutions too). But what happens when you want to use Scran records in a commercial or public situation, one which isn’t covered by the above? When you’re publishing a magazine or a book, for example? Or creating an exhibition for the general public? That’s where the ‘Buy’ button comes in.

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Clicking the button initiates a ‘licensing’ process, where the user tells us what they want to use the record (image, audio clip or video clip) for. Scran then gives the user a quote for usage, and the price for usage depends on how many times the record will be used, and where, and at what size; the price for using a large Scran image on the cover of a book that will be printed 100,000 times will be greater, for example, than that for a thumbnail image that will be reprinted on page 8 of a small circulation newsletter. The money raised by licensing materials in this way is split 50/50 between Scran and the owners of the materials.

One organisation that recently licensed a nimg_25141umber of Scran records in this way is Fife Cultural Trust, and Scran recently paid a visit to Kirkcaldy Galleries to see the resulting exhibition ‘SPAN- a Tale of Three Bridges + Kate Downie‘. It’s a great look at the history of the Forth Rail Bridge, the first Forth Road Bridge and the new road bridge that is due to open next year, and, in a separate gallery, there is a series of artistic responses by Kate Downie to the bridges themselves. In the first gallery, the history of the bridges, Scran images make up over 50% of the exhibition, and you can see some of the pictures that were used, in context, below. We especially like the large scale invitation for the opening of the Forth Rail Bridge, from National Museums Scotland- we think it looks great at such a scale. The exhibition continues until February 2017.

© Image: Forth Rail Bridge opening of 1890 from National Museums Scotland. Licensor www.scran.ac.uk.

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We Are Family (History)

5th October 2016 by Scran | 0 comments

Scran is a great complementary resource for people researching their family history. Our collections are chock full of stills, movies and sounds illustrating Scotland’s places and people. From births, deaths and marriages to schooldays, holidays and working lives.

Scran will be exhibiting at Fife Family History Fair on Saturday 8th October at Carnegie Conference Centre, Dunfermline.

Find out more about how to Get Into Scran.

 

Image © Aberdeen City Council, Almond Valley Heritage Trust, Douglas MacKenzie, East Lothian Museums Service, National Museums Scotland, Newsquest (Herald & Times) | Licensor Scran