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Culture Heritage Learning

All the Rage

29th July 2016 by Scran

I had to do some work in South Edinburgh this lunchtime, and took the opportunity to drop in to the Open Door in Morningside to see the Scran-enabled exhibition “All The Rage” (see posts below). It’s obvious that a lot of hard work went into it, and the quotes from the Open Door’s clients were a great addition to the Scran photos of yesteryear’s fashions on display throughout the ground floor of the building. It’s on until August 12th, and if you’re in the area well the exhibition is well worth a look.

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This gallery contains 6 photos

Willaim Leiper 1839-1916

7th July 2016 by Scran | 0 comments

The work of the Glasgow architect William Leiper is often overshadowed by that of his near-contemporaries Alexander “The Greek” Thomson and Charles Rennie Mackintosh. However, he was nearly as prolific and eye-catching as his more well-known colleagues, and his most well-regarded building, the Templeton Carpet factory in Glasgow, is as stunning today as when it was completed over 100 years ago.

In the centenary year of his death, his life and work is being celebrated in a small exhibition at the appropriately-named Leiper Fine Art gallery in Glasgow. Housed in the William Leiper-designed Sun Life Building, the gallery hosts regular exhibitions by fine artists, but for the next two months as part of the Festival of Architecture, it is also hosting a small but informative exhibition on the life and works of the building’s designer. As well as photos of his many buildings, including Auchenbothie House in Kilmacolm and Kinlochmoidart House in the Highlands, the exhibition includes two terrific scale models of one of his buildings but also a large luxury yacht he designed for a Russian tsar! The exhibition features contributions from Scran’s esteemed colleague, Mr Simon Green of Historic Environment Scotland.

Definitely worth a look if you are in Glasgow city centre, the exhibition runs until mid-September.

Templeton's Carpet Factory

Leiper exhibition poster

Images © Charles McKean, Andrew James Licensor Scran

Photo Finish

30th June 2016 by Scran | 0 comments

Scran, along with some colleagues from Historic Environment Scotland, recently participated in a whole school project with St Mark’s Primary School in Barrhead, East Renfrewshire. Themed around photography, various classes throughout the school participated in a number of cross-curricular events encompassing science, art and design, mathematics and more.  These events included taking digital self-portraits, exploring and photographing the local environment, and playing with perspective in photographs. Most intriguingly, pupils selected a photograph from a selection by renowned photographers including Man Ray, Herbert Bayer, Steve McCurry and Dorothea Lange (pictured),and researched and critiqued the photographs in written essays.

The work that the school did culminated in a day of celebration where many of the photographs the pupils had taken were displayed in the hall, others were framed and offered for sale to visitors, and a public speaking competition took place. In this competition, part of a national initiative called ARTiculation, the best of the critical essays were read out by their authors for a panel of judges from HMI and the Glasgow School of Art. Parents were invited, coffee and biscuits were served, money was raised, and the pupils’ confidence was improved, their skills were enhanced and their literacy and critical skills were developed. Some photographs that came out of the project will appear on Scran in the near future. We greatly enjoyed being a part of the St Mark’s School photography project and look forward to an even bigger and better programme next year!

Image © Victoria & Albert Museum Licensor Scran

From Demob Suits to Chelsea Boots

20th June 2016 by Scran | 0 comments

Post-War Fashions 1940s to 1960s: a community curated exhibition

Fifties Fashion © Scottish Borders Council by kind permission of Woolmark. Licensor www.scran.ac.uk.

Fabulous Fifties Fashion

One Tuesday in September last year Scran went along to The Open Door in Morningside, Edinburgh to deliver a slideshow to showcase our digital archives.  There is nothing unusual in this.  Scran delivers a wide and varied remit of outreach activities.  However, this session was the start of something quite exciting.

Good Neighbours

We had been invited to meet the Good Neighbours Club, a group of older people who meet regularly at The Open Door.  The Open Door initiative has been supporting older people in Edinburgh for over 30 years, offering day services and a range of activities, from art and poetry to gentle exercise.  The Club, a group made up largely of ladies aged 70 plus, meets every Tuesdays for a day of ‘friendship, fun and laughter’.

The slideshow of images of old Morningside, from the 19th century, through the early years of the 20thcentury, to more recent years provoked a lot of chat and debate.  Of particular interest, old photographs of Morningside Railway Station which was closed in the 1960s; the Open Door is based in a building adjacent to the old station platform.

Scran was able to draw on a wealth of material from a range of contributors, including The Scotsman Publications Ltd and the National Collection of Aerial Photography.  As well as the old station, we covered themes of schooldays, shopping and buses and trams.

Exhibition

Following our visit, Kirsteen Powell, Day Care Service Manager at the Open Door, got back in touch.  She wanted to do more work with us and so we met and an idea formed.  With such striking images causing such a lot of interest and reminiscence activity at the centre, why not put on an exhibition?

The Good Neighbours Club chose a theme with social history at its heart – fashions of the post-war era.  And selected images will be displayed in the centre’s coffee shop, a great space fronting onto Morningside High Street.

The exhibition project kicked off in May of this year, with Scran delivering two more reminiscence workshops: we’ve explored the utility fashions and clothes rationing of the forties, the bouffants, brylcreme and big skirts of the fifties and the miniskirts and the sharp suits of the sixties.  With the group’s permission, each workshop was recorded and a selection of their own personal anecdotes and memories in text form will be used to interpret the photographs selected for the final exhibition.

Reminiscence Tool

The project demonstrates the fantastic range of living memory material held within the digital archives of Scran and its potential as a tool for reminiscence work.

The exhibition opens in mid-July.

Images © Scottish Borders Council by kind permission of Woolmark | Licensor Scran

Scran out & about

7th April 2016 by Scran | 0 comments

Amazon RiverRecently, as well as continuing our twilight teacher training sessions, we’ve started to work extensively with a number of schools, directly with the children in the classroom during school hours. At Royal Mile Primary School we worked with a class of P5s on their South America topic. While Scran is perhaps not the first place you’d think to turn for South American materials, the children were able to compile a shared Album full of images of people, wildlife, jewellery, food, flowers, landscapes and more, drawing on records from the National Museums of Scotland, Cairns Aitken, and the University of Aberdeen’s Zoology Museum among others. They then annotated this with their own text, gleaned from private research about their chosen images, and presented their findings at a school assembly. In this way, the children were able to demonstrate independent learning, share knowledge with their peers and collaborate effectively, all using Scran content and tools!

Stuff Album slide

A slide from a pupil’s Album

At St Pius RC Primary, meanwhile, we worked with a class of P6s over a number of weeks, on their CSI and Forensics topic. Again, while this topic isn’t one of our strongest suits, the students found plenty of fascinating records on fingerprinting, DNA, detective work and the like. Using Scran, the students compiled individual Albums of images related to the topic (including lots of pictures of money, phones, judges and jails!), then used these to frame a piece of creative writing about a fictitious crime, again overwriting the text in their Albums with their own choices of words. These albums were then copied to a group Stuff account, and shared with the class. Again, a lot of Curriculum for Excellence experiences and outcomes (namely personalising, editing, sharing etc.) were achieved with very little effort using Scran’s content and tools. The work that the students did on Scran complemented other classroom activities investigating the science of forensic investigation.

If you’d like us to come to your school and work directly with your class, just get in touch!

Images © Cairns Aitken, Design Council, DHRC/University of Brighton | Licensor Scran 

 

A Day Trip to Dunoon

21st March 2016 by Scran | 0 comments

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1950s booklet © Argyll & Bute Library Service

Scran paid a visit to Dunoon & it was a grand day out!

The purpsose of our visit was to meet the team of volunteers working with Dunoon Burgh Hall Trust as part of their Pop Up Programme. The Trust is in the midst of an exciting project to reclaim what is one of the town’s most important civic buildings. The 1873 Hall, listed on the Buildings at Risk Register for Scotland,  is currently undergoing a major refurbishment and restoration programme. If you are curious to see the before pictures, there are 99 images available via Historic Environment Scotland on Canmore.

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Zoomorphic figure at main entrance © Crown Copyright: HES

Meanwhile the volunteers are not letting the dust settle – they are investigating local heritage and all things relating to the history of this seaside town & the wider Dunoon community. During our visit we were able to show everyone how to access Scran, free of charge using their Argyll & Bute library cards. Together we looked at and discussed a host of collections material, including the day the Waverley ran aground – seen below in 1977. Some of the volunteers remembered it clearly & memories were exchanged. There were other reminiscences too, relating to more controversial events in 1984 when different peace demonstrations took place in Dunoon.

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The Waverley 1977 © The Scotsman

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Pop Up Scran! 2016 © Dunoon Burgh Hall Trust

Of course the relationship between Dunoon Burgh Hall Trust & Scran pre-dates this visit. The Trust previously contributed film footage from Holy Loch Heritage – the American Presence a project which aimed to bring to life the 30 year period when the American Naval Base was sited at nearby Holy Loch. We are delighted to say our partnership is set to extend into 2016, when we look forward to sharing more Dunoon ephemera surfacing from the restoration works. To see what’s been lurking under their floorboards, watch this space.

Images © Argyll & Bute Library Information Service, Historic Environment Scotland, The Scotsman, Dunoon Burgh Hall TrustLicensor Scran 

Free Copyright Masterclass, Glasgow 9th March

1st March 2016 by Scran | 0 comments

CLA website screenshotCopyright and its implications can be a daunting subject.  If you work in FE, and would like to find out more about how to use copyrighted materials legally and safely, our friends at the Copyright Licensing Agency are running a Masterclass in Glasgow on Wednesday March 9th at the Scottish Youth Theatre on Brunswick Street. Scran will be speaking at the event, alongside speakers from the Association for Learning Technology, Educational Recording Agency and more. The event is free, runs from 11.30am to 4pm, and lunch is provided. For more info and to sign up, visit http://fe.cla.co.uk/copyright-masterclass/

Image © CLA

Treasure, Targes & Tartan too.

25th February 2016 by Scran | 0 comments

Following on from our engagement work discovering Jolomo, there was whole-school learning through the visual arts in both Dunbarney & Abernethy Primary Schools – it could be said there was a hive of artistic activity.  So, let’s have a look at some distinctly Scottish outcomes.

P1/2 – got to grips with all aspects of tartan, weaving & some Katie Morag for good measure

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P4 – carefully considered and constructed a targe each to carry into battle

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P5 – created treasures inspired by Mary Queen of Scots through jewellery design &  feltmaking

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P6 – updated Burnsimage using Pop Art to produce drawing & painting portrait work

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All of this fantastic artwork was celebrated in an exhibition Inspired by Scotland, visited by family & friends over the course of several days.  Pupils also performed song, dance & poetry in an expressive arts event, drawing the whole project to it’s conclusion. Finally Scran would like to congratulate the staff & pupils on a job well done!IMG_1125

Images © National Museums Scotland, Blairs Museum, James Gardiner | Licensor Scran 

From Agros to Zygi

10th November 2015 by Scran | 0 comments

On the road again in Cyprus,  so what did we do with Archnetwork today ?

SIMG_9852aturday 19th September 2015. After such a full day in the capital, we stayed local and visited the neighbouring village of Kato Drys. Firstly, we went to the top of Sotira hill, behind Lefkara to get panoramic view across the Larnaca District and surrounding landscape and visited the tiny church perched there. It had some charming icons dating from the early C20th.

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Next stop was by an ancient oak and some knarly, old olive trees. We heard from Martin some local folklore about village rivalry & how the village took its name from the many “Dryes” (oaks) that grew in the area. Martin also informed us about community efforts to sew acorns & regenerate some of these magnificent trees.

We had the pleasure of visiting house of Elli Papachristoforou, who generously let us sample some of her honey which was rather special. She then gave us a guided tour of both the (Embroidery) Museum of Folk Art and the (Bee) Agricultural Museum of Kato Drys. Both were captivating and provided further context for everything we had learned over the previous days in respect of Cypriot culture, nature, social & economic growth. The homestead of Reo Stakis was pointed out to us, the famous son of the village who built the Stakis Hotels empire.

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Sunday 20th September 2015. In the capable hands of our host for the day, Adriana Patkova, we wove our way through the twisty mountain roads of Cyprus, spotting beehives, bikers, wind turbines, reservoirs, solar farms, eucalyptus trees, terraces & an asbestos mine.

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I took issue with the interpretation on site, there was the distinct lack of information about the hazards of asbestos & the effects on the nearby mining villages as clearly studied in here. 02497501Report on the Health Effects of the Asbestos Mines on the … Some advice for visitors poking around in the rocks would not go amiss. Contaminated land from historical mining in Cyprus is an issue. The Amiantos Asbestos Mine in the Troodos National Park, where we stopped is undergoing restoration. The biodiversity conservation, restoration and management project concludes at the end of December 2015.

Moving on. IMG_9976We arrived at picturesque Agros where we visited a smokery, had a peek into the smoking room at Kafkalia and sampled their products; posirti, lountza, loukanika, hiromeri, zalatina, tsamarelle and pastourmas. After lunch we continued to climb to the top, reaching Troodos Square we couldn’t help but notice the familiar environment, it looked like Scotland! There was a thistle to prove it. The British military presence was again, all around. We went to the rather dated visitor centre and proceeded to Pano Platres where we saw a peculiar post box. Finally we had a long drive, down to the coast and back to Lefkara with a pit stop in Zygi.

Silversmithing & Stansted

Monday 21st September, our final day. IMG_9845We made an early morning visit to the silversmiths in Lefkara and learned about their processes, which are mostly mechanised but involved all sorts of materials, rubber, wax, plaster and of course silver. The workshops were very interesting but we could not linger. Adriana had to get us to the airport for our incredible journey home to Glasgow, via Stansted. I’m glad to say on our way to Paphos she took us to see Aphrodite’s Rock, the ideal way to say goodbye & ευχαριστώ

The experiences of this week were fascinating. From knowing very little about Cyprus I now feel after this cultural exchange that I have gained a decent understanding of Cypriot life, both contemporary and traditional.

Everybody we encountered was genuinely friendly & extremely welcoming. I found more personal parallels with the socio-political divide in the country than I expected. The cuisine was fabulous, the crafts exquisite, the landscape so dry and different & the company… well, we had a lot of fun too.

Imagery © Newsquest, Licensor Scran &  J.Sangster

 

Loulla’s Farm, Lefkosia North & South

2nd November 2015 by Scran | 0 comments

Another instalment from our education officer’s report on the Archnetwork Erasmus+ course, Empowering Communities in Cyprus

Friday 18th September 2015. Today started with a trip into the countryside for breakfast. On our way a black snake slid across the road in front of us, apparently a large Whip-Snake, quite a sight. At Loulla’s Farm we found out how Cypriot cheese is made, we had a demonstration of how the goats’ milk is treated, brined and stored to producehalloumi – yum! The process was straightforward with the addition of a pinch of mint and a vacuum pack, done. Outside there was a cheese safe containing what I believe was maturing kefalotyri, another Cypriot delight. We got to visit the goats & even meet a day old kid. Now we were ready to see Lefkosia or Nicosia, on both sides.

NIMG_9765earing the capital city of Cyprus I was surprised to see a giant Turkish Cypriot flag painted onto the side of the Kyrenia Mountains – what a statement. Following the conflict of 1974, the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus TRNC became a self-declared state, however it is only recognised by Turkey. The political and military dispute in Cyprus remains unresolved and the island continues with life, divided. The Green Line runs 112 miles from east to west across the island, splitting families, property and communities.

We parked by the C16th Venetian city walls and continued on foot through the narrow back streets to our first destination, Helen’s of Kyrenia, a lace shop at 33 Ippokratous. The stock in the shop dated back decades. To my delight amongst the heaps of lace, tatting & embroidery, I found a packet which explained the provenance of the Lefkara lace within; Guarantee Hand Made – Made in Cyprus – Irish Linen – French Thread. Perfect.

Despite the daily impasse, the people of Nicosia go about their business as usual, at least on the surface. Once you start to look around however there are clues on the streets. Still on the south side of the city, we began to notice thought provoking graffiti, not unlike the imagery that adorns the barrier walls of Bethlehem or indeed the peace lines of Belfast. When people live conflict every day for 40+ years, it cannot be ignored. at the time The Scotsman newspaper reported08930264 on the Turkish-Cypriot war & is documented with poignant imagery from 1974. (Image © The Scotsman. Licensor Scran)

FullSizeRender (10)Nicosia is a vibrant & sophisticated city, with a buzz in the streets. Trendy shops & coffee houses lined the artists’ quarter. After a little pick-me-up in the form of some Cyprus coffee, μέτριο for me please, we neared the Green Line. Passports at the ready we crossed over to the north side of the city through two sets of border control, Greek & Turkish. It was easy enough the pass through, plenty of tourists and locals alike were going to & fro. Yet, CCTV was evident, uniformed armed guards were on duty & signage warned us that photography was strictly forbidden in this narrowIMG_9794slice of no-man’s land. The freely available maps of the city tell their own story, both versions simply do not show basic information on their enemy’s side. Visitors must use not one, but two, maps to see the lay of the land and get their bearings in Nicosia.

IMG_9797Once we had crossed the Green Line we made our way to the breath-taking Buyuk Han or Grand Inn. It as built in 1572 by the Ottomans and was been restored to it’s former glory in the 1990s. The contrast in the city was immediately apparent. We passed by the intriguing Selimiye Mosque as the call to prayer rang out. Formerly it was the Cathédrale Sainte Sophie, so architecturally & spiritually it has been re-purposed. IMG_9809The result is an odd juxtapostion of east meets west – gothic grandeur, flying buttresses with minarets and ornate window grills. I even spotted a Green man lurking in the masonry over the entrance. Also by the main door there was a suspiciously Scottish looking, ironwork structure used for the washing of feet. It was not dissimilar to a bandstand, however it had obviously been re-purposed too. I was unable to find any makers mark but it was reminiscent of the products shipped around the world by The Lion Foundry of Kirkintilloch. (Image © East Dunbartonshire Council. Licensor www.scran.ac.uk.)IMG_981506400282

The many souvenir shops in the area were selling Turkish Delight, not Cypriot Delight, as they were just a few hundred metres away. Within the Buyuk Han, we feasted on a meze of Turkish Cypriot dishes and then visited the wonderful Senay Ekingen, at Su-Ha Tic. Senaye studied tourism in England and has run her business since 1987, making Lefkara lace in the traditional manner as well as creating new products to incorporate it, such as bags & jewellery. She also imports her base fabric from one of the last linen producing mills left in Ireland, Thomas Ferguson.

IMG_9826Not only is she a successful businesswoman, but Senaye also works on bi-communal projects, using craft to bring together Cypriots from both sides of the divide and trains up young apprentices too. Thereby generating hope for the future and breaking down barriers. Later we visited the amazing Yagcioglu haberdashery, which stocked the all-important DMC (Dollfus-Mieg & Compagnie) French embroidery thread for making Lefkaritika, in an extensive back catalogue of colours. (Here’s an example of embroidery on Scran using DMC thread)

IMG_9806We wound our way back along the colourful Ledera Street, via the folk arts museum, stumbled on some Limassol Brick & Tile co. roof tiles for good measure & once again crossed the Green Line, pausing to look at the contemporary sculptures in our path.

Imagery © J.Sangster