Scranalogue

Culture Heritage Learning

Views of North Berwick & Vicinity (3)

20th October 2015 by Scran | 0 comments

Here’s the final update on the partnership work with Mrs. Dalgleish’s wonderful Primary 5 class, at Law Primary School in East Lothian. After bated breath, the wind got up enough strength allowing us to complete our exploration of aerial photography. The sun shone, we went outdoors & finally flew the kite aerial photography kit. See how we fared by browsing through the gallery below.

During an InSET session yesterday Law Primary School staff had a presentation detailing the full project. It was agreed that the class had achieved their learning intentions & much more besides.

  • I will be able to use Scran confidently to research a topic
  • I will have a better understanding of aerial photography
  • I will help to curate & create an exhibition

You can download the attached CfE learning experiences & outcomes for the project.

Before signing off, we’d like to say a big Scran thank you to Mrs.Dalgleish and everybody in P5 who made this such a success!

Imagery © Portrait of John Marr, East Lothian Museums Service / Various Aerial Images RCAHMS – Licensor www.scran.ac.uk

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Views of North Berwick & Vicinity (1)

22nd September 2015 by Scran | 3 Comments

Scran will be working closely with the P5 class at  Law Primary School in North Berwick throughout next week. Together we will be examining lots of local content and weaving what we find into our learning journeys. Views of North Berwick

As well as being digital, weather permitting, we’ll be taking to the skies with our camera & K.A.P. kit. So please, fingers crossed for fair weather over East Lothian.

Many of the resources we will use in class come from  East Lothian Museums Service who are contributors to the collections on Scran. For example, this rather quaint souvenir is leather bound and originally contained 15 black & white photographs with tinted skies. It was published by Valentine of Dundee around 1895, so it gives us a clue as to how long people have been visiting the beautiful seaside at North Berwick.

What more will our Primary 5 digital detectives be able to discover about where they live? We’ll be looking at lots of aerial imagery, considering how the town has changed and expanded over time. We’ll think about traits & trades which may have remained the same and finally, when we reach the end of our collaborative investigations, we will share our findings – so tenterhooks until then.

Image © East Lothian Museums Service. Licensor www.scran.ac.uk

Kite Aerial Photography

25th August 2015 by Scran | 3 Comments

Recently we’ve been getting to grips with the kite aerial photography kits provided by Dr. John Wells of the Scottish National Aerial Photography Scheme (SNAPS). As you can see we visited Tantallon Castle for a practice flight. We were quite pleased with our results & the potential for learning.

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We are planning on piloting this activity with schools over 2015/16, so if you are interested please contact us & lets’s go fly a kite! 

We believe exploring the aerial photography collections on Scran, in combination with the active learning involved in kite aerial photography, could lead to all sorts of creative learning.

For example, studying aerial photography can support the following Curriculum for Excellence experiences & outcomes within Social Studies.

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  • describe the major characteristic features of Scotland’s landscape and explain how these were formed (SOC 2-07a)
  • discuss the environmental impact of human activity (SOC 2-08a)
  • explain how the physical environment influences the ways in which people use land by comparing the local area with a contrasting area (SOC 2-13a)
  • use knowledge of a historical period to interpret the evidence and present an informed view (SOC 3-01a)
  • compare settlement and economic activity in two contrasting landscapes (SOC 3-13a)
  • explain the impact of processes which form and shape landscapes on selected landscapes in Scotland, Europe and beyond (SOC 3-07a)
  • evaluate the changes which have taken place in an industry and debate their impact (SOC 4-05b)
  • discuss the sustainability of key natural resources (SOC 4-08a)

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    Salisbury Crags Holyrood Park

  • assess the impact of developments in transport infrastructure in a selected area (SOC 4-09b)
  • describe and assess the impact of human activity on an area (SOC 4-10a)
  • explain the development of the main features of an urban area and evaluate the implications for the society involved (SOC 4-10b)

Welcome

21st August 2015 by Scran | 0 comments

Hot off the press, the Scranalogue has arrived. We are delighted to share what’s happening at Scran via our brand new blog. Keep up to date with new content arriving in our many collections, for example we’ve some great new oral histories about Falkirk during World War One.

See what we’re up to in the field trialling Kite Aerial Photography thanks to Scottish National Aerial Photography Scheme, SNAPS

Meet us in person, we’ll be busy exhibiting and supporting events throughout autumn 2015, starting with the Scottish Learning Festival quickly followed by Doors Open Day in Edinburgh.

Image © Scottish Maritime Museum. Wireless News from SS Athenia, 1933. Licensor www.scran.ac.uk

Aerial Photography

20th August 2015 by Scran | 0 comments

On Scran there is a staggering amount of aerial imagery to explore & have fun with. Aerial photographs are simply pictures taken from above. There are two types of aerial photograph – vertical and oblique.jackies2_00996809

Vertical aerial photographs are taken with a camera directed straight down towards the ground, as vertically as possible, at a right angle or 90 degrees. They are usually taken from immediately overhead with a camera fixed to the underside of an aeroplane. Such vertical aerial photographs are often easy to compare with maps and can help develop mapping skills.

Oblique aerial photographs are taken at angles less than 90 degrees to the ground and are usually taken by a photographer through the window of an aeroplane. This oblique perspective allows us to see more familiar view of the landscape, where details of urban and rural land-use become obvious.

Landscapes, buildings & architecture and our whole environment and history can be appreciated in new ways by examining aerial photographs. For example, have a look at these very different aerial pictures of Clachnaharry, near Inverness.

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However, you don’t need an aeroplane to take aerial photos, another option is Kite Aerial Photography, which is a great outdoor learning experience. Aerial photographs can be used to illustrate various aspects of the curriculum, including Learning for Sustainability themes. Perfect for studying geography; aerial imagery can help answer questions about coastal activity, population density, economic activity, glaciers, commercial development, tourism and climate. Not to mention visual arts, archaeology, geology and various interdisciplinary approaches.

We hope you are able take the time to look at Scotland from a bird’s eye view on Scran.

Images © NCAP & RCAHMS. Licensor www.scran.ac.uk